Emirates Animals Export Co,. Ltd

Affenpinscher

Learn about the temperament and personality of the Affenpinscher. Discover what he's like to live with, his traits and characteristics and how he generally behaves. And look at lots of Affenpinscher photos.

Affenpinscher is German for Monkey Dog, and the Affenpinscher is every bit as active and playful as his name implies. These are peppy, plucky, busy, fun-loving, mischievous, and sometimes conniving dogs. The Affenpinscher is a small dog with a big attitude! Sometimes they are too intelligent for their own good. Obedience training can be tricky with this breed. The Affenpinscher is loyal, affectionate and devoted toward his master and friends. He is always ready to protect his owner, his home, and his family's possessions. They are very good watchdogs, reserved with strangers, and fearless toward any aggressor. This little dog thinks he is far larger than he is. An Affenpinscher parent will need to remain vigilant that his little guy does not pick a fight with a dog ten times his size! These hardy dogs are very active indoors. Most of their exercise needs can be met with indoor play, but they do enjoy daily outdoor walks. They are charming little comedians and will entertain you by throwing their toys up in the air and walking around on their hind legs, just for fun. They are generally quiet, but can have erratic, nervous reactions to stimuli that they find nerve-wracking: noise, people, animals, and especially children. It is very important to socialize this breed to help thwart this tendency to freak out. Affenpinschers do not particularly like kids, but pose no threat to them. This is a toy breed that can easily be injured by a child who means no harm. An Affenpinscher can and will bite if provoked, so children must be taught to be respectful with him. While this is a smart breed, and while they will quickly learn things that interest them, they are notoriously slow at housetraining. They also like to eat weird things so that you have to take them to the vet: rocks, lipstick, candy wrappers, dead bugs, etc. These loving dogs will want to be with you all the time. They will crave your attention and companionship and will want to cuddle and sit on your lap. And they will show you their sensitive, gentle side, once they are certain you can handle it.

Afghan Hound

Learn about the temperament and personality of the Afghan Hound. Discover what he's like to live with, his traits and characteristics and how he generally behaves. And look at lots of Afghan Hound photos.

The Afghan Hound is a dignified sight hound with an independent spirit. The personalities within the breed differ drastically, but all Afghans are loyal, loving companions when placed with an active, loving family! Afghan Hounds need regular exercise. They like to run, so will do best with a fenced yard, but be aware that some Afghans have been able to jump over fences. If Afghans do not get enough exercise, they can become destructive. And Afghans are smart enough to open dresser drawers in order to get at something you really don't want them to chew. Afghans have a sense of humor and require the same of you. They are happy dogs who are independent thinkers and can be difficult to train. Sometimes they are so intelligent that their intelligence can make training more difficult. They can be difficult to housetrain, and are notorious for not performing well on the recall. They are also notorious for running away. Afghans have a strong prey instinct and will chase anything that moves. This includes small animals inside your home. Many Afghans have successfully lived with cats, but this does not mean that they are trustworthy around all cats. The Afghan is calm and patient and he does well with well-behaved children. They are usually wary around strangers. These are loving dogs who are not overly demonstrative. Some dig. Some climb. Some will try to commandeer your furniture. Most of them will feel entitled to sleep in your bed. These are sensitive creatures, and are particularly sensitive to stress. Maybe this is why they make such good therapy dogs.

Airedale Terrier

Learn about the temperament and personality of the Airedale Terrier. Discover what he's like to live with, his traits and characteristics and how he generally behaves. And look at lots of Airedale Terrier photos.

The Airedale Terrier, the "King of Terriers," is brimming with personality. He has the trademark terrier temperament: energetic, curious, feisty, and boisterous. He thinks he is a comedian and will provide you with years of comic relief. He craves your attention and will act out to get it. They are intelligent, and quick learners, but they certainly think for themselves, so their idea of "trained" might differ from yours. They are notoriously unreliable on the recall. They seem to think everything over. They like to work with you, not for you. They seem to be born mischievous and act like puppies until they are about two years old. They like to destroy doggie beds, shred newspapers and eat rugs. They also love to dig. They will also steal laundry and food. They like to find their own adventures in life. To minimize their misbehaviors, it is imperative that you give your Airedale daily exercise. They enjoy doing most anything you do: hiking, jogging, backpacking, canoeing, camping, and agility. They are loyal, devoted, and protective, and will bark when someone approaches the door. They are excellent watch dogs! The Airedale will certainly stand his ground (one time that the stubbornness works for you). The Airedale is a terrier, and will chase small animals. They are not reliable with cats, unless they grow up with them, and even then, it's not a sure thing. Some Airedales are aggressive with other dogs. Airedales do wonderfully with children, but these are large, exuberant, high energy dogs with head-butting enthusiasm who like to roughhouse. They can injure a young child without ever meaning to, so many breeders recommend they don't go to homes with young children. Airedale parents need to keep a close eye on their dog's health, because Airedales rarely show pain. They can be seriously injured or really ill and still be wagging their tail. If an Airedale is for you, then you will need to be devoted to a high maintenance, high energy member of your family. They need your affection and attention and they will want to supervise everything you do. With careful, diligent, patient training and parenting, the Airedale can be the best family pet in the world, but you have to be the right family. You need to be okay with a rowdy, jolly joker helping you run your house!

Akita

Learn about the temperament and personality of the Akita. Discover what he's like to live with, his traits and characteristics and how he generally behaves. And look at lots of Akita photos.

The Akita is a strong, courageous, and family-oriented dog. They have strong guarding instincts and are protective and territorial. They are quiet, large and powerful dogs who can be intimidating. Temperaments range within the breed. Some are calm, and some are aggressive, so the breed should always be supervised around children. They are not usually aggressive toward people, but they are wary of strangers. They are food aggressive, so they need to have their own food dish and a safe space to eat. Care needs to be taken to keep children away from the food while the dog is eating. The Akita is typically gentle with and protective of children, but isn't always tolerant of the erratic behavior of small children, and no child wants to be snapped at by a giant Akita. They can also be intolerant of other dogs and are often aggressive towards other animals. They have a natural hunting instinct and should never be allowed to roam outside of a safely fenced-in area. The Akita is bright and sensitive, but he is also independent, headstrong, and dominant, so it is important to start obedience training early. If you do not assume the role of pack leader, he will. However, with patience and perseverance, the Akita is highly trainable because of their intelligence. They are rather famous for being easy to housetrain. The Akita has moderate exercise needs and should get exercise daily. They are sensitive and responsive and will thrive on your attention. Your Akita will probably decide his purpose in life is to protect you and spend time with you. The Akita will only bark for a good reason, but they do "talk" a lot. They grunt and groan and mumble to communicate, which is endearing for the Akita lovers of the world. They also like to carry things in their mouths, and this includes your wrist. They might take hold of your arm and gently lead you to the food bin. While it takes the right person and family to raise an Akita, the rewards are rich. Your Akita will be a part of the family, a loyal protector with unparalleled devotion.

Alaskan Malamute

Learn about the temperament and personality of the Alaskan Malamute. Discover what he's like to live with, his traits and characteristics and how he generally behaves. And look at lots of Alaskan Malamute photos.

This arctic sled dog was bred for strength and endurance, and you don't want to get into a wrestling match with an Alaskan Malamute! They are incredibly strong, and you will need to commit to obedience training early so that you don't end up struggling to control a full-grown dog. They are independent and can be stubborn, so training can be a challenge. It's just a matter of whether or not they want to obey your commands, not whether or not they understand. Remember that they were bred to pull, so teaching them to walk on a leash without pulling is a must! The Alaskan Malamute has an incredibly high energy level and needs to exercise every day. They are athletic and playful and do best with a fenced-in yard. You need to take care that they don't get away, as they have a predator streak, and they have been known to kill livestock and wildlife. They can also be the neighborhood cat's worst nightmare. They are usually aggressive with other dogs, especially those of the same sex. However, the Malamute loves people. He seems to love everyone equally and is not a "one-man dog" like many other breeds. He is ridiculously friendly, and will probably kiss anyone who breaks into your house. They seem to have no inclination to guard your property. They also don't tend to bark much (though they do howl). He isn't a good watchdog. Despite their reluctance to guard you, they will be loyal and devoted and affectionate (though not fawning). They are happy and like to run and play and bounce around a lot. He never seems to get tired. They are patient with children, and do very well with well-behaved kids, but need to be supervised, as they can accidentally knock a young child over. A Malamute will insist on being part of any and all family activities. A Malamute that doesn't get enough exercise will misbehave. They seem to be particularly fond of getting into the trash and stealing food off the countertop. They are highly food motivated, so don't leave them alone with the wedding cake. You also have to supervise their diet, as they can easily overeat. They also love to dig and can transform your yard with seemingly little effort. Sometimes they dig simply to find a cool place to hang out. Malamutes will talk to you. They have a variety of sounds that they can make and they will use these unique "words" to sass you if they feel the need. For a Malamute to be happy, he needs a lot of your time, energy, love and attention. And plenty of exercise. But if you can make that commitment, the Malamute is an awesome, fun, cuddly, loving, lovable, and strong pet!

Standard American Eskimo Dog

Learn about the temperament and personality of the Standard American Eskimo Dog. Discover what he's like to live with, his traits and characteristics and how he generally behaves. And look at lots of Standard American Eskimo Dog photos.

playful, and affectionate companion dog. They are excellent watchdogs, and take their watchdog duties very seriously. They are naturally protective of their homes and families. They are wary of strangers and will bark to announce their arrival. However, sometimes Eskies get carried away with their barking. The Eskie can be a dominant breed and needs obedience training early. These are independent-thinking problem solvers, yet they are surprisingly easy to train. They want to please their owners and thrive on their praise. They quickly master tasks and tricks and do very well in obedience work. The Eskie's understanding of human words and tone is commendable, and many Eskie owners claim that their dogs talk to them. But just as quickly as they learn, they can also become bored. And a bored Eskie can become noisy, mischievous, and destructive. They are avid chewers and have been accused of being stubborn and ornery. They need daily exercise and enjoy hiking and jogging. They especially love to play in the snow and will do so for hours if you let them. They love to roughhouse and play games. They are gentle and playful with children, especially if introduced to them when young. They also do well with other dogs and with cats. However, they will chase rodents, birds, and other small pets. The Eskie thrives on human company and will want to be part of everything you do. These constant companions have even been called nosey, they investigate everything. If they feel left out of the family, they will misbehave. They don't like to be left alone for long periods of time, and will make sure you hear about it. They want to be the center of attention and if you oblige, they will shower you with kisses. The Eskie is an active dog when young, and as they age, they become more mellow and affectionate.

American Foxhound

Learn about the temperament and personality of the American Foxhound. Discover what he's like to live with, his traits and characteristics and how he generally behaves. And look at lots of American Foxhound photos.

need to make a commitment to ensure that their dogs get enough exercise. An American Foxhound who doesn't get to burn off his energy will become bored and destructive. He will probably use his teeth to destroy your house. He can be pretty rambunctious when he wants to be. The American Foxhound has an independent spirit and can be very stubborn, so obedience training is important for this breed, as is active socialization. Even though an American Foxhound is intelligent, training him requires a lot of skill, persistence, and patience. He has an incredible sense of smell, and if he picks up a trail that interests him, he will follow it, and will no longer be able to hear your voice. He needs to be kept on a leash or in a safe, fenced-in area. These dogs, like most dogs, are not car smart. In the home, the American Foxhound is sweet, kind, loving, and loyal. They thrive as members of a family. They are mild-tempered and easygoing and get along well with children and with most other pets. They usually do well with other dogs but can be aggressive toward dogs of the same sex. The American Foxhound has a special bark: a loud, deep bark followed by a high-pitched howl. Foxhound owners love it, but a Foxhound's neighbors might not feel the same way. Fortunately for the neighbors, Foxhounds are generally not nuisance barkers.

American Staffordshire Terrier

Learn about the temperament and personality of the American Staffordshire Terrier. Discover what he's like to live with, his traits and characteristics and how he generally behaves. And look at lots of American Staffordshire Terrier photos.

who thrives when he is part of a family. They are intelligent, graceful, loyal, feisty, courageous, and very, very strong. Amstaffs are an active breed, always ready for fun, and they love to play outdoors. They are high energy and need regular exercise. They can be rowdy and overly exuberant, especially when they are young. They do best when they have a job to do. A bored Amstaff will destroy your house. They do well in obedience, agility, tracking, and conformation. Obedience training is very important with this breed. They really need an interactive owner who will spend time with them, training them and playing with them and just being their best friend. But they also need an owner who is able to establish leadership, as Amstaffs definitely have a mind of their own. Amstaffs are protective and they look imposing so they can make an effective deterrent, but they are really too friendly to be guard dogs. Some Amstaffs are dog aggressive and none will back down if challenged. Amstaffs love their children and are patient, gentle, and tolerant. Of course, very young children should always be supervised around any dog. This is an animal who will strive to please you and take great pride in making you laugh. He will demand a lot of your attention and will be an excellent companion, for you and your family.

American Water Spaniel

Learn about the temperament and personality of the American Water Spaniel. Discover what he's like to live with, his traits and characteristics and how he generally behaves. And look at lots of American Water Spaniel photos.

The State Dog of Wisconsin, the American Water Spaniel, was bred to be a companion as well as a retriever. This is an athletic, active, and energetic dog who loves his daily exercise. They need to be kept busy in order to work off some of their energy. Though they are great all-around hunting dogs, they also enjoy runs in the park, swimming, playing in the backyard, obedience training, and agility work. He needs to exercise his brain as well, as he bores easily, and if gets bored, he can be destructive. He is a very vocal dog and can be quite the little barker, but training can help with this. He is intelligent, eager to please, and responds well to obedience training. He is a happy, friendly, tenacious, outgoing dog who loves to be the center of attention.

Anatolian Shepherd Dog

Learn about the temperament and personality of the Anatolian Shepherd Dog. Discover what he's like to live with, his traits and characteristics and how he generally behaves. And look at lots of Anatolian Shepherd Dog photos.

The Anatolian Shepherd Dog was developed, and has been bred for hundreds of years, to guard livestock. This is a working breed that is instinctively protective and territorial. He is possessive toward his family, property, and livestock. He is loyal, protective and loving toward his family, but is not overly demonstrative with his affection. He is suspicious of strangers and doesn't like it when they approach him boldly. In general, the Anatolian Shepherd does not like to be patted on the head by someone he doesn't know. He might try to control the movements of your guests by physically blocking their path in your house. If annoyed with something, the Anatolian may snap his teeth, bark, growl, or draw his lips back. He is generally quiet and calm, and will only sound the alarm if he senses a threat, but this often happens at night. The Anatolian is an independent thinker, but he is trainable. Still, he will not go out of his way to please you. But obedience training is important, as without it, he can have aggression issues. And because of his size and strength, he would be impossible to handle without some obedience skills. The Anatolian naturally wants to be the pack leader and needs an owner who assumes this role, even when the Anatolian is being stubborn and trying to take position of pack leader for himself. Even though this dog is fairly calm and may even appear lazy, he still needs exercise. If bored, he can become destructive and may destroy things in your house. The Anatolian enjoys children, but sees them as his charge, not his masters. Interactions should be supervised due to the dog's size and strength, as well as his temperament. The Anatolian can do well with other dogs if raised with them, but he will probably want to be the alpha dog in every situation and will show dog aggression. Most do not appear to enjoy the company of other dogs. In short, the Anatolian is an alert, smart, observant, serious, responsive, courageous, fiercely loyal guard dog. He has been bred to be a guard dog, and that is what he is.

Australian Cattle Dog

Learn about the temperament and personality of the Australian Cattle Dog. Discover what he's like to live with, his traits and characteristics and how he generally behaves. And look at lots of Australian Cattle Dog photos. Australian Cattle Dog

were bred to herd cattle, and they are immensely strong, energetic, and smart. They have a very strong personality and in order to be happy, will need an owner who is just as strong and stubborn as they are. Once this match is made, the Australian Cattle Dog excels at obedience, both in the ring and in real life. They are obedient, but bold. They want to please you, but they also think for themselves. They respond quickly to their master's signals and commands. Australian Cattle Dogs need to be exercised both physically and mentally. They do best in working environments, and if they don't live on a farm, they will need something else to do. They love to be put to tasks that require them to think. A bored ACD will be very destructive and will destroy your house. They excel at agility, flyball, herding, and Frisbee competitions. They also make excellent jogging, hiking, biking, and rollerblading companions. They also enjoy a good game of fetch. Australian Cattle Dogs bond closely with their owners, once the owners have earned it, and become remarkably loyal companions. For this reason, they do not like to be left alone for hours at a time. They are protective of their family and property. Some are particularly suspicious of strangers, so early socialization is important -- you do not want your dog biting the Avon lady. They can do well with other dogs and cats if they are socialized properly. Australian Cattle Dogs love children, but it is a delicate situation. ACDs were bred to herd, and use their mouths to do so. They will nip at the heels of children. Early training with an experienced trainer is necessary to curtail this behavior, but even then, there are no guarantees. A "nip" from an ACD is not a serious injury, but it causes serious pain to a child, and is not acceptable. Also, if another child is roughhousing with your child, and your dog sees this as abuse, he will protect "his" child, which can be a serious liability. They may also nip you in moments of excitement. And while this is not dangerous in itself, your dog will have to be taught that he cannot use his mouth on people. He will try to herd anything: you, animals, your neighbors, and cars. They will chase cars. They are fearless animals, and thanks to their high pain tolerance, have been called "the rugby players of the dog world." They are also said to have a great sense of humor. The temperaments of Australian Cattle Dogs can vary as much as the temperaments of people, but all ACDs have incredible energy levels, all have free spirits, and all of them will make you the center of their universe. His attachment to you will be intense. He will follow you everywhere you go and want to be part of everything you do.

Australian Shepherd

Learn about the temperament and personality of the Australian Shepherd. Discover what he's like to live with, his traits and characteristics and how he generally behaves. And look at lots of Australian Shepherd photos.

highly intelligent, incredibly energetic, people-loving dog who needs to have a job to do. They need lots and lots of exercise and will fit in well with an active person or family. They are bred to herd, and might try to herd anything, including you, your children, your neighbor's child on a bicycle, innocent strangers jogging past your house, ducks, squirrels, cats, and cars. You will need a fence to keep them off the road. They also have strong guarding instincts, and want to be near their family at all times. Originally bred as all-purpose farm dogs, Aussies were left to supervise the children while the parents worked in the fields. They are good with children, except for the occasional nipping at their heels to herd them into position. They will follow you from room to room and supervise you in the bathroom. They are very affectionate and will want to lick your face. They are assertive by nature, highly territorial and can be pushy. They are very protective of their family and home, and are cautious around strangers. They need lots of mental stimulation and physical exercise, or problem behaviors will arise. They are the opposite of the couch potato dog. They need to have a sense of purpose, which is why so many of them excel in obedience and agility competitions. They are highly trainable, versatile, and are quick learners. They usually love to play ball and Frisbee, and many of them enjoy swimming. If you are in the market for a full-time center of attention family pet, full of exuberance and demanding of your attention, then an Aussie might be for you. They are good-natured, eager to please, and remarkably loyal. But they will need to be at the top of your priority list.

Australian Terrier

Learn about the temperament and personality of the Australian Terrier. Discover what he's like to live with, his traits and characteristics and how he generally behaves. And look at lots of Australian Terrier photos.

intelligent, boisterous, adaptable, and agile. He is a touch mischievous with the courage of a much larger dog. An Australian Terrier will be happiest and at his best when in close contact with his family. He shows great affection, gentleness, and loyalty for his immediate family, but can be wary of strangers. He is alert, responsive, curious, protective, and makes an excellent watchdog as he is quick to bark if someone approaches the home. Australian Terriers do not usually display aggression towards other dogs, but they can be a bit bossy. Two unaltered males in the same household will not get along. An Australian Terrier will chase cats, rabbits, and squirrels as his prey-drive is strong. They love to play games with children and do well with youngsters if they are not teased by them. They may snap at a child who teases them. The Australian Terrier is intelligent but needs obedience training because he prefers to follow his own ideas. He can be quite full of himself, yet they are often easier to train than other terriers. They are born diggers and jumpers and have high energy levels, so they need regular exercise and consistent training to help control these behaviors.

Basenji

Learn about the temperament and personality of the Basenji. Discover what he's like to live with, his traits and characteristics and how he generally behaves. And look at lots of Basenji photos.

the Basenji is one of the oldest natural breeds in the world. The Basenji is a small hunting dog from Africa. He is a proud, faithful, teasing, playful dog who will try to outsmart you every chance he gets. He has a phenomenal intelligence, and is also an independent thinker. They have a reputation for being stubborn, but they can be taught in the hands of a skilled trainer. They are not terribly obedient. It is important to establish yourself as the pack leader with the Basenji, so early obedience training is important. The Basenji has a lot of energy and loves to play and to stay busy. He will need plenty of exercise. While they are predominantly used as hunting dogs, they also excel at lure coursing, agility, and tracking. The Basenji needs to be kept on a leash or in a fenced area at all times. The Basenji has a strong prey drive and loves to chase. He is incredibly athletic and can jump over or climb most fences. He will dart for an open door or gate and be gone before you know it. And once he is gone, he is very, very fast. They are not famous for their reliability with the recall. When in pursuit of their prey, they have no car sense. The most common cause of death for the Basenji is being hit by a car. It is true that the Basenji doesn't bark, and it is a quiet breed most of the time. But he is not silent. The Basenji can be loud when he wants to be. He can crow like a young rooster, whimper, and whine. He has a loud growl when he needs one and he actually yodels when he's happy. He also wails when he's unhappy. The Basenji is affectionate, but not as demonstrative as other breeds. He loves his human family, but can be aloof with strangers, so early socialization is important. Because he doesn't bark, he is not a watchdog in the traditional sense, but he is alert and will make noise to let you know if something is wrong. He is also naturally protective of his family, especially children. While many Basenjis have lived successfully with children, it is a tricky situation. Most Basenjis show a particular affection for children. However, many Basenjis will not tolerate being abused by children and may bite to defend themselves if the child is teasing or inadvertently frustrating them. Also, Basenjis are a dominant breed and tend to think of children as their equals. They may try to dominate children by nipping at them. They are truly a people dog. The Basenji will crave your attention and if he doesn't get it, he can be destructive. They usually like to get into the trash and play with fresh rolls of toilet paper. They do not like to be left alone for hours at a time and if they get lonely, they might dig or chew, or simply eat your sofa. Most Basenjis get along well with other pets, though they shouldn't be trusted around birds or rodents. Male Basenjis can be aggressive toward other male dogs. The Basenji is a unique breed: intriguing, engaging and complex. They can be charming and trying at the same time. They are incurably inquisitive and can be mischievous. They are meticulous about their cleanliness, constantly grooming themselves. They can't stand being dirty. They don't like water either and may refuse to walk in the rain. This is a challenging breed, but for those pet owners who have taken on the challenge, they swear the Basenji is the best companion a person could have.

Basset Hound

Learn about the temperament and personality of the Basset Hound. Discover what he's like to live with, his traits and characteristics and how he generally behaves. And look at lots of Basset Hound photos.

Known as the clown of the canine world, a Basset Hound is sure to bring you some laughs. The Basset Hound is a terrific family pet, because they are intelligent, easygoing, sociable, loving, and loyal. They are great with children and other dogs, and are friendly with strangers. They love to be part of the family and go for rides in the car, watch TV with you, and play in the yard. They are also prone to mischief. They are a pack hound, and are uncomfortable when left alone for hours at a time. If no humans are available, a Basset will need another dog or cat to keep him company. The Basset Hound is famous for being stubborn and strong-willed. He is a master of getting his own way. He will hurl his 65 pounds onto your lap when you are least expecting it, sometimes when you are sleeping. Even though the Basset was bred to be a hunting hound, they often behave more like an oversized lapdog. A Basset needs to be kept on a leash or safe in a fenced-in area. He will often follow a scent that interests him, which can sometimes lead him into dangerous situations, like a road. Even though they are not high energy dogs, they are capable of impressive bursts of speed. While Bassets can be lazy and love to sleep for hours in a patch of sun, they also love to go for long, unhurried walks. If you want to own a Basset, you must be comfortable with drool and slobber. Bassets love to eat and will beg for and steal food any chance they get. They are not opposed to climbing up onto the table to lick plates. They are also good for cleaning up food spills, but are infamous for snatching a cracker out of a young child's hand. It is not safe for Bassets to do much jumping, so a Basset owner must be prepared to provide a boost now and again, helping their Basset into a car and onto the couch. Bassets are often difficult to housetrain and are prone to gassiness. They love to "sing," which your neighbors might interpret as baying or howling.

Beagle

Learn about the temperament and personality of the Beagle. Discover what he's like to live with, his traits and characteristics and how he generally behaves. And look at lots of Beagle photos. Beagle

The Beagle is merry, friendly, gentle, playful, and even-tempered. He has a sensitive nature. He can be distant with strangers until they've won him over. He's kind and gentle with children. He's territorial and protective of his family. He has a highly developed nose and will wander off after interesting smells. For this reason, he needs to be securely fenced in or on a leash when he's outdoors or he will wander miles away after a scent and might get hit by a car or lost. He's more interested in finding out where that fascinating smell comes from than obeying your commands! He also doesn't make a good jogging companion because he stops every second to investigate every smell. He loves to play with you! He can be quite noisy: baying and barking. He loves his food and will eat until he bursts if allowed to. He can be quite ingenious in coming up with ways to get to the food in the cupboard, in the bin or on the table! His favorite past time is digging in the dirt. He craves lots of close physical contact, love and attention from his human family!

Bearded Collie

Learn about the temperament and personality of the Bearded Collie. Discover what he's like to live with, his traits and characteristics and how he generally behaves. And look at lots of Bearded Collie photos. Bearded Collie

The Bearded Collie is an active, outgoing, intelligent, affectionate, and sometimes boisterous dog who makes a great family pet for an active family. The Bearded Collie needs exercise, both physical and mental. Beardies are playful and like to jog, swim, wrestle, play Frisbee, and go for brisk walks. They are always ready for action and are happy to join their family in any activity. With what seems like boundless energy, they also enjoy agility, herding, obedience, and tracking. They love to work in partnership with their masters and are very responsive to you. They also make good therapy dogs because they love people. They see everyone as either a friend or a potential friend. They need to be with their loved ones and can become destructive if left alone for hours at a time. They will bark when lonely or bored. Barking is an important part of this breed's working style, but it can be a problem for some people, especially those with close neighbors. Beardies are usually not "yappy" problem barkers, but they do bark when excited and they announce all visitors with joy. And once those visitors cross the threshold, Beardies will greet them by jumping on them, unless you train them not to. But with all the training in the world, Beardies are still jumpers. Beardie owners affectionately call them "bouncy." They can easily jump a four-foot fence. (They can also dig under them.) When you get home from work, they will probably greet you by jumping up and kissing your nose. Beardies can be a touch stubborn and need obedience training. They are independent thinkers, but are also anxious to please you. They will do just about anything for your approval, but sometimes they add their own special twist. They may not obey commands if they don't see the point, and they are rather famous for keeping their owners humble. They've been known to open cupboards and steal food, counter surf, and eat television remotes. They can have quite a sense of humor. They usually get along well with children and other animals, especially when raised around them. However, Beardies will often try to herd their family members and some will nip at the ankles of young children. Within the breed, temperaments range from laid back to rowdy, but they can all be a bit silly. They are sensitive, responsive, adaptable, gentle, and devoted. And they can sweep your coffee table clean with a single wag.

Beauceron

Learn about the temperament and personality of the Beauceron. Discover what he's like to live with, his traits and characteristics and how he generally behaves. And look at lots of Beauceron photos.

The Beauceron is self-confident, faithful, intelligent, gentle, fearless, and loyal. He tends to be aloof with strangers. He gets along well with children. He's protective of his family and makes a good guardian. He's and loving and affectionate with the family. He becomes deeply attached to his master. He's highly playful. He isn't a couch potato, but an active dog that likes to burn his energy outside. If bored he can become destructive. His herding instinct remains strong and he may attempt to herd people or objects.

Bedlington Terrier

Learn about the temperament and personality of the Bedlington Terrier. Discover what he's like to live with, his traits and characteristics and how he generally behaves. And look at lots of Bedlington Terrier photos.

The Bedlington Terrier is an adaptable, versatile, affectionate, and entertaining dog. He is determined, inquisitive, opinionated, feisty, and fearless. He has a big heart and will become your shadow following you around everywhere you go. He loves to play, retrieve, jog, and curl up with you when you curl up with a good book. He enjoys just hanging out with you. He is a clownish extrovert and likes to be the center of attention. He will leap for joy when visitors come to your house. He is an energetic, yet gentle, playmate for children. He loves all people, but he especially loves children (though no Terrier will put up with being teased by one). He is usually very quiet unless something gets his goat and then the terrier in him takes over. While he can be a bit headstrong, he is also eager to please. But he is only moderately easy to train. Bedlingtons usually get along with other dogs, but will fight. He has a high prey drive and will chase furry animals, and he is fast, so he is safest kept on lead or in a fenced-in area. But be careful, because Bedlington Terriers are very enthusiastic and talented diggers!

Belgian Malinois

Learn about the temperament and personality of the Belgian Malinois. Discover what he's like to live with, his traits and characteristics and how he generally behaves. And look at lots of Belgian Malinois photos.

The Belgian Malinois is a very-fast-learning, highly-trainable, high-energy, versatile working dog. They can make great pets for highly-active, high-energy families. But a Belgian Malinois will not be happy unless he gets lots of daily exercise and has a job to do. Because of this breed's trainability and intelligence, Belgian Malinois are often used today as police dogs, military dogs, and homeland security dogs. Domestic Belgian Malinois excel at obedience, schutzhund, agility, flyball, Frisbee, herding, sledding, and tracking. It doesn't matter so much what their job is, as long as they have one. These are busy "perpetual motion" dogs who need more than just a daily walk. They enjoy hiking, running, and biking, and make good jogging partners. They do best with a fenced-in area to thrash around in. (The alternative is the Malinois zipping around your house, leaping over furniture and smashing into things.) The Malinois is very loving toward his family and reserved toward strangers. They are naturally protective of their owners without being aggressive. They make good watchdogs as they are incredibly alert and will notice sights, sounds, and smells that you don't. They have a high prey drive and will chase small animals. Many Malinois will chase vehicles. When raised around children, Malinois are good with them. However, young children need to be taught not to run past the Malinois waving their arms and shrieking, as this may trigger the Malinois' prey drive. Also, keep in mind that Malinois are tremendously physical animals and might run into a child accidentally... over and over again. He might also try to herd children. (He might also try to herd you and other animals in the house, sometimes all at the same time.) The Malinois is extremely sensitive and social and will want to be part of your family. If he feels neglected, he will entertain himself. By digging holes in your mattress, for example.

Belgian Sheepdog

Learn about the temperament and personality of the Belgian Sheepdog. Discover what he's like to live with, his traits and characteristics and how he generally behaves. And look at lots of Belgian Sheepdog photos.

The Belgian Sheepdog (also known as Groenendael) is a high-energy, highly versatile dog known for his loyalty and protectiveness. They develop very strong bonds with their owners. They thrive as members of highly active families, especially when given jobs to do. The Belgian Sheepdog is very quick to learn, highly trainable, very intelligent, and needs to be mentally stimulated! He also needs to be physically stimulated with lots of daily exercise! They enjoy obedience, schutzhund, agility, flyball, Frisbee, herding, sledding, and tracking. They also work as search and rescue dogs, guide dogs, and therapy dogs. If you don't give him enough exercise and purpose, the Belgian Sheepdog will run around your house causing chaos and destruction, while barking all the time. If he gets bored, he will probably chew the rockers off your rocking chair and destroy your couch. The Belgian Sheepdog loves to be with his family, but can be wary of strangers. They are alert and observant and make good watchdogs. They are naturally protective, and are even possessive. They might try to herd you and your kids. They do well with children. However, these are strong, energetic dogs, who might accidentally run into and knock over a child. They will also chase small animals. They do best with a fenced-in yard, and they love to spend time playing outdoors. But this doesn't mean you can banish him to the yard. Belgian Sheepdogs need to be with their families. They are sensitive, affectionate dogs, who with proper love and discipline are happy, responsive, playful companions with a great sense of humor. They can live anywhere, country or suburban, as long as they get to use up their energy. They just need an owner who is willing to invest the necessary time and effort in training, exercising, socialization and bonding!

Belgian Tervuren

Learn about the temperament and personality of the Belgian Tervuren. Discover what he's like to live with, his traits and characteristics and how he generally behaves. And look at lots of Belgian Tervuren photos. Belgian Tervuren

The Belgian Tervuren is a high-energy, highly devoted family dog known for his loyalty, versatility, and protectiveness. They love to be near their people, but they also need a job to do. The Belgian Tervuren is highly trainable. They are intelligent and very fast learners. This is a breed who needs both mental activity and vigorous, daily exercise. They make excellent hiking and running companions. If they get bored or lonely, they will probably destroy your garden, dig holes in the lawn, or chew a hole through your sofa. They are good family guardians as they are observant and alert, with a healthy suspicion of strangers. They can be very possessive of their people. Due to their instinct to herd, they may try to herd you and your children. (They also sometimes chase cats.) Temperament varies widely within this breed. Some Tervurens are mellow and some are livelier, but all will be demanding of your attention. They want to do things with you and they love to learn new things. They are courageous, sensitive, affectionate, happy, responsive, playful and always in motion. They don't know they aren't lapdogs and they may try to sit on you. They have a great sense of humor. Belgian Tervurens have performed well as search and rescue dogs, therapy dogs, and avalanche rescue dogs. They also excel at obedience, rally, and agility competition.

Bernese Mountain

Learn about the temperament and personality of the Bernese Mountain Dog. Discover what he's like to live with, his traits and characteristics and how he generally behaves. And look at lots of Bernese Mountain Dog photos.

The Bernese Mountain Dog was bred to be the farmer's companion, and today, a Bernese Mountain Dog will want to be by your side at all times. They make a great family dog, and usually single out one person in the household to be their best friend. They are loyal and devoted and will strive to please you. They are excellent with kind and gentle children. They are extremely intelligent, and are known for manipulating their humans. Because of their intelligence, they need to be mentally stimulated. They are gentle, easygoing, good-natured, affectionate, and docile. They are incredibly devoted to their own family, and generally aloof towards strangers. A tendency to be shy runs in the breed, and early socialization is important. Most Bernese Mountain Dogs do well with other animals, but some of them do chase smaller animals. They need daily exercise, but not as much as some more energetic breeds. They don't enjoy playing fetch and certainly don't make good jogging partners. In warm weather, they will dig holes to try to get at the cool earth, and this will often happen in your favorite flower bed. In general, they love to be outside, as long as you are there with them. They always want to be part of the family and will demand a lot of your attention. Inside, they are usually quiet and calm, though their wagging tail will often find your cup of coffee. They do not bark unnecessarily, but will announce a stranger at the door, so they make good watchdogs. They are very protective of the members of their family. They are slow to mature, and can act "puppyish" for several years. The younger Bernese Mountain Dogs are very active, and the older ones are pleasantly mellow, though they still take a lively interest in family business. In short, this is a devoted breed who will need to be right in the thick of things.

Bichon Frise

Learn about the temperament and personality of the Bichon Frise. Discover what he's like to live with, his traits and characteristics and how he generally behaves. And look at lots of Bichon Frise photos.

The Bichon Frise is an incredibly cheerful little dog who loves to be the center of attention. He likes to think he runs the household, and will want to be at your heels or in your lap at all times. They are naturally gentle, intelligent, playful, and happy. They make a good family dog, but many breeders do not recommend they live in homes with small children, because the children could easily accidentally injure them. And if harassed by a child, a Bichon Frise will get snappy. They do, however, get along well with other household pets, as long as they get lots (and lots) of their human's attention. They do not do well being alone for hours at a time, and can start to chew at their own skin and fur out of distress. They can also bark out of boredom and loneliness, which will not necessarily endear him to your neighbors. Speaking of barking, the Bichon Frise is good at it, and will bark often. They have great hearing and will bark at everything. They do not need lots of exercise, but will require regular short walks. They are social dogs and like to get out and about and see people. The Bichon Frise does best with a loving, patient owner, as they are notoriously slow to housetrain.

Black and Tan Coonhound

Learn about the temperament and personality of the Black and Tan Coonhound. Discover what he's like to live with, his traits and characteristics and how he generally behaves. And look at lots of Black and Tan Coonhound photos.

Primarily used as a hunting dog, the Black and Tan Coonhound can also make a loving family pet. They are people-oriented, gentle and playful. They love to spend time with their families. They will expect to be allowed on the furniture and they love to go for rides in the car. Most are laid-back and good with children and other animals. However, most will also take any opportunity to chase small animals up a tree and then bark to let you know they've done so. Their bark is deep and booming -- Westminster Kennel Club calls it a "mournful bawl" -- and your neighbors might not appreciate it. Though they do not need to hunt to be happy, they do need moderate daily exercise on a leash or a fenced area. A fence is important, as the Black and Tan has an excellent nose and will follow his nose on a trail he finds exciting. He will tree the neighborhood cat. These are independent dogs who are slow to mature, so early obedience training is important. These are outgoing, friendly, happy-go-lucky dogs who adapt well to any situation in which they are loved. Just be careful with giving kisses, as many of them like to drool!

Black Russian Terrier

Learn about the temperament and personality of the Black Russian Terrier. Discover what he's like to live with, his traits and characteristics and how he generally behaves. And look at lots of Black Russian Terrier photos.

The Black Russian Terrier is large, intelligent, robust, powerful, protective, and territorial. He loves his family deeply but is aloof and distrustful toward strangers. He is a good watchdog, and doesn't usually bark unless there's a reason. He is born with an instinct to guard and protect, and he will protect your family, yard, house, and vehicle. Just his appearance alone might thwart intruders. He is confident and courageous. He will instantly become defensive in dangerous situations, but relaxes as soon as the danger passes. Because of his size, strength, and dominant nature, early obedience training is really important. He is alert and responsive and adapts well to training. This dog needs lots of human companionship, and will want to be part of the family. He will want to be with you at all times, following you from room to room and sharing your life. They love to go for rides, so you might need to get a bigger vehicle. Some BRTs want to be touching their owners at all times, just so they know they are still there. They will want to sleep with you and they love to give big, wet, sloppy kisses, especially when you are in a deep sleep. Not that you'll get much sleep because they also snore like chainsaws. They will develop behavioral problems if they get lonely. They need daily exercise and love to hike, swim and jog. They excel in obedience and agility competition. They are excellent jumpers. They are wonderful with children and like to lick leftovers off their faces. BRTs are very gentle and quite tolerant of ear and tail pulls. Just be sure you don't let your toddlers try to ride them like a horse. Their beards get quite wet, especially if they've just had a drink. They can spray water on your walls and ceilings. And they always love to snuggle, whether or not their beards are wet. They can do well with other pets, but two unaltered males in the same household will want to dominate each other. The Black Russian Terrier is a determined, fearless, and deeply devoted dog. With proper socialization and training, he can be an excellent companion.

Bloodhound

Learn about the temperament and personality of the Bloodhound. Discover what he's like to live with, his traits and characteristics and how he generally behaves. And look at lots of Bloodhound photos. Bloodhound

Bloodhounds are the perfect companion pet for a human who wants a challenge. Their noble expression can be quite charming and a Bloodhound will be the most affectionate and loyal dog in the world, but you will earn it! They are stubborn. They like to be in charge and they assume that they are. While some breeds aim to please you, the Bloodhound aims to challenge you, just for his own entertainment. Possessing a superior sense of smell, a Bloodhound is likely to take off on a trail ignoring all your commands to stop. They need to be in a fenced-in yard (and they don't do well with invisible fences) or on a leash at all times. However, they can pull like a tractor, so start training them to walk on a leash early! A bloodhound puppy usually starts behaving like an adult at about three years old, but you will be training your bloodhound for his whole life. A "teenage" bloodhound will be very energetic and need lots of exercise. A "mature" bloodhound might nap all day. Bloodhounds of all ages will need to spend time with you and hate to be left alone. With lots of love and patience, the bloodhound can be well-trained and well-behaved, and several of them have done well in obedience competition. They are very intelligent, but it takes a while for them to learn not to chew and eat batteries, rocks, towels, and diapers. They are incredibly gentle with children, but need to be closely supervised, because children will be tempted to pull on the Bloodhound's extra skin. Their bark is frighteningly loud and deep. They also howl. So while they can be particularly stinky due to the folds in their skin, and while they can be a touch stubborn, while they can shoot drool and slobber on four walls at once, they are also loveable, loving, loyal, and fun, unless you want them to play fetch -- that they just will not do. They will shower you in cuddles and attention and needs lot of cuddles and attention in return.

Border Collie

Learn about the temperament and personality of the Border Collie. Discover what he's like to live with, his traits and characteristics and how he generally behaves. And look at lots of Border Collie photos.

Border Collies, known as the workaholics of the dog world, are a lot of work. They need a job to do, whether its herding, agility, flyball, Frisbee championships ... anything to keep their overactive brains busy! If you don't give a Border Collie the physical and mental exercise he needs, he will destroy everything. And I'm not just talking about socks and teddy bears. I'm talking: mattresses, recliners, carpets, and wooden stairs! They can also seriously harm themselves by ingesting foreign objects. Some have even eaten nails and knives! And a Border Collie can total the interior of a car. These athletic, working dogs are extremely athletic and need hours of exercise each day! They need to run, and they need a purpose. Some well-meaning parents make the mistake of assuming they can just set their Border Collie free in the backyard and that will suffice. It doesn't even come close. You need to challenge your Border Collie. The breed is bred to be challenged! They have a strong herding instinct and they will try to herd anything, including children. While the dog means no harm, it can be frightening to a small child to be herded by a Border Collie, and if the child tries to run away from the scene, the Border Collie might nip at the child's heels or bum. They are not trying to be cruel. They've been bred to be herders. But it still hurts to be nipped. Border Collies are excellent with children, but it takes vigilance on the part of the parents, to make sure both children and dog learn how to interact with each other. Border Collies also try to herd cars, which puts them in danger of being hit. Border Collies do best in a fenced-in yard. But be aware that Border Collies are extremely athletic and can jump over a six foot fence if they decide it's worth the trouble. Border Collies will not necessarily do well with other animals in the house either, because ... you guessed it -- they will try to herd them. It is impossible to train the herding out of a Border Collie. These dogs are highly intelligent and will try to over-think everything. They've been called the most intelligent breed in the world. So prospective owners should ask themselves, "Do I want a dog who's smarter than me?" But for the right person, the devoted, passionate Border Collie parent, the breed makes an affectionate and extraordinarily devoted pet. They are sweet and sensitive. They are even known for reading their owner's minds (which could be a good or bad thing). They are not avid barkers, but can be good watchdogs, as they are reserved with strangers and are naturally protective of their family and home. Border Collies love to entertain themselves, which might end up entertaining you. Many of them can become obsessed with a red penlight, a housefly, a ceiling fan, or a siren on television. Border Collies can have hilarious personalities! So, if you want a full-time job, a dog who can turn doorknobs, a psychic friend, a living alarm clock, and you think you can keep up with him (or rather, one step ahead of him), then the Border Collie is for you!

Border Terrier

Learn about the temperament and personality of the Border Terrier. Discover what he's like to live with, his traits and characteristics and how he generally behaves. And look at lots of Border Terrier photos. Border Terrier

The Border Terrier is a hardy little dog who will want to be part of your family. They are not as feisty as other terrier breeds, but they do still have a mind of their own. They are intelligent, creatively so, and though they are trainable, they are also independent thinkers, so they are not the most obedient breed. However, they do excel in earthdog, obedience, and agility trials. These are active, agile, athletic dogs who need daily exercise. They are high-energy (though not hyper) and are happiest when they have a job to do. While they are, in essence, a no-frills working dog, they are also excellent housedogs. While they are affectionate, and while they do want your attention, they are not in your face and under your feet every minute. They will be content to be in the room with you, hear an occasional word from you, and get a few hugs a day. Unless you have food -- then all bets are off. They have a high prey drive and will chase small furry critters, including cats. They make good farm dogs because they keep nuisance animals away. But they will also kill your son's pet hamster. They will also bolt across the road after a neighborhood chipmunk. They are not car smart and more Border Terriers are killed each year by cars then by disease or old age. Borders are also prone to just wandering off looking for someone to visit. They are really quite friendly! It is best if a Border Terrier has a fenced-in yard, but even then, be aware that they are the Houdinis of the dog world. They can climb fences and they can dig under them, so you had better prepare to invest in a serious fence. Border Terriers can be aggressive with other dogs, especially those of the same sex, so it is important to start socialization when the dog is young. Many, many Borders do just fine in a household with other dogs. Border Terriers do very well with well-behaved children. Of course, all child-dog interactions should be supervised. They are very loud barkers, and will get fairly excited when they see a squirrel though the window or the UPS man across the street. Most Borders will howl and sing several times a day. Border Terriers are not always popular with the neighbors. They will bark when someone is at your door, and once the door is open, they might greet the person with a kiss. Border Terriers like to jump on people and you might spend your dog's entire life trying to teach him not to do this. They also like to dig, so if you don't want help with the gardening, you will need more fencing. They also like to chew. A Border's chewing phase can last for years. Rugs and chair legs will suffer, and dog toys don't stand a chance. They hate being left alone and if you try it, they will try to eat your house. But when you are there, they are bouncy, happy little guys who will make you laugh. They are game for anything: learning new tricks, or watching television and licking your feet. They are a great companion for someone who is ready to commit to a dog who needs a lot of exercise, someone who doesn't mind an assertive dog. Your Border will need regular interaction and stimulation. Oh, and he'll want to sleep in your bed too.

Borzoi

Learn about the temperament and personality of the Borzoi. Discover what he's like to live with, his traits and characteristics and how he generally behaves. And look at lots of Borzoi photos. Borzoi

The Borzoi is an athletic, agile, and affectionate breed, famous for their intelligence and independence. They are large, strong, and fast, so early obedience training is recommended. These are smart dogs but they are stubborn and very slow to learn your commands. They are however, quick to housetrain. Borzois do well with children when they are raised with them, but most Borzois will not tolerate rough treatment from a child. It is also important to remember that this is a large dog who can accidentally knock over and injure a small child during play. They usually do well with other pets in the household, but male Borzois can be aggressive with other male dogs. The Borzoi is a sight hound and he loves to run, and he loves to chase. Just because he loves your cat doesn't mean he won't chase the neighbor's cat across town. It is crucial to keep a Borzoi on a leash or in a fenced area at all times, because he will chase anything that moves. And if he gets away from you, you will never catch him. These dogs need daily exercise and love to run and go for long walks. They love spending time outside with their family. These are affectionate dogs, but are not as demonstrative and needy as some breeds. They can be aloof, especially around new people. They are very quiet dogs and rarely bark, so don't make very good watchdogs. They are generally well behaved, but behave like puppies for a long time. If a Borzoi gets destructive, it is probably because he's bored. Borzoi are noble, proud, and dignified. They are gentle, loyal, loving, and will want to sleep in your bed!

Boston Terrier

Learn about the temperament and personality of the Boston Terrier. Discover what he's like to live with, his traits and characteristics and how he generally behaves. And look at lots of Boston Terrier photos. Boston Terrier

The Boston Terrier, also known as "The American Gentleman," is enthusiastic about life and is often excitable. They are an ideal family dog, as they are adaptable, full of fun, loyal and loving. They are also intelligent and trainable (though a bit stubborn). They are often slow to housetrain. They are friendly to everyone: you, the kids, and the neighbors. He is very affectionate, and not afraid to show it in public. He will also strive to entertain you and can be quite the little comedian. He will most certainly bounce on you and lick you. He will want to go for rides with you and will want to sleep in your bed -- did I mention he snores and farts a lot? He will expect you to buy him toys, as he loves to play with them. He will also expect to own a small portion of your favorite lounge chair. Because of their size, they can live comfortably in an apartment or on a farm. He is alert will bark a warning when someone new is at the door, but he does not bark much unless there is a reason, this makes him an excellent watchdog. They are an energetic breed and do need some exercise, but be aware that they cannot tolerate extreme temperatures. Boston Terriers require a lot of time, attention, and human companionship. But if you have these things to give, you will get a true, gentleman companion in return.

Bouvier des Flandres

Learn about the temperament and personality of the Bouvier des Flandres. Discover what he's like to live with, his traits and characteristics and how he generally behaves. And look at lots of Bouvier des Flandres photos.

The Bouvier Des Flandres is the ideal farm dog: calm, rational, and intelligent, with an independent nature. They also make devoted family companions. They will be a family friend and guardian. They are alert, resolute, and fearless. They are naturally territorial and protective and have a fantastic "No Trespassing" bark. Yet they do not become aggressive unless it is absolutely necessary. They are aloof toward strangers, but seem to have an innate sense of who is and who isn't a real threat. If they deem someone a threat, they will bark and/or growl. Because of their size and strength, and their assertive personalities, it is essential to start obedience training with this breed early. If you do not learn to control your Bouvier, he will control you. But they are trainable and serve as police dogs and military dogs. They also excel at agility, carting, tracking and herding. Just be aware that this breed is not blindly obedient, and can be a bit stubborn. The Bouvier needs a great deal of outdoor exercise. He will need at least a long daily walk. Bored and inactive Bouviers will chew, dig, bark, and destroy. They usually get along well with other pets, especially if they are raised together. Some Bouviers however can be cat or dog aggressive. These are people dogs. They will want to follow you everywhere. Companionship is their top requirement. They are affectionate, but are not overly demonstrative. They are exceptionally good with children, and seem to have a natural empathy with them. They are emotionally sensitive dogs and seem to know when you are happy, angry or sad. Just beware that these are large dogs who might try to herd your children, especially during play. In fact, they might try to herd anything, including bicycles, joggers, and cars. These are rugged, serene, sober, thoughtful, even-tempered dogs who make it their job to love their families. Just be aware: they have very stinky flatulence.